Top Ten Literary Places I’d Like to Visit

Scott Monument EdinburghThis week’s Top Ten Tuesday prompt from The Broke and the Bookish is a freebie, and seeing as I’ve recently come to the UK for a year of study, I thought I’d use this opportunity to share my list of top literary places I’d like to visit while I’m here. Whether I’ll be able to visit all (or any) of these remains to be seen; but like all travelling bookworms, I dream big.

Top Ten Literary Places I’d Like to Visit (in the UK)

  1. Abbotsford: Walter Scott’s medieval-style house is, according to descriptions, a testament to this famous Scottish writer’s passion for collecting: books, armour, and hundreds of historical artefacts are on display. It seems like a fascinating insight into the mind of a prolific writer.
  2. Manchester: Now, judging from Elizabeth Gaskell’s novels, nineteenth-century Manchester was not exactly a place you would want to go. It comes across as drab, dreary, and filled with unhappy and dissatisfied souls. But I loved North and South, and it would be interesting to see the city that inspired it. Not to mention that they recently reopened Elizabeth Gaskell’s house there, and it looks like a fascinating place to visit.
  3. Greenaway: As a big fan of Agatha Christie, I would love to visit her house in Devon. It looks like it could be the setting of one of her own murder-mysteries. I’d constantly be expecting Poirot to come pottering around the corner.
  4. Strawberry Hill House: Horace Walpole, the father of Gothic fiction, built this bizarre house on Strawberry Hill, in what is now London. It borrows many elements of Gothic architecture, both inside and out, and apparently it’s one crazy place to visit.
  5. Whitby Abbey: Apparently the inspiration for Bram Stoker’s Dracula, this ruined abbey looks absolutely picturesque. I’d love to wander around the old ruins, and see the place lit up at night (but from a safe distance, to protect myself from any wandering vampires in the area, of course).
  6. Tintagel Castle: It’s been associated with Arthurian legends since Geoffrey of Monmouth wrote about it in the twelfth century. The historical evidence that Arthur existed may not be strong, but this castle seems like the perfect place to pretend that he did.
  7. The Lake District: Numerous poets and novelists have fallen in love with England’s Lake District. When I visited a few years ago, I was stunned by the beauty of the region: the greenery, the sparkling water, the old stone houses scattered here and there. I’ll never forget reading Frankenstein by the open window of my hotel, looking down on the lake as the daylight faded. It’s one of the most simple, and most magical, experiences of my life, and I’d dearly love to return and relive it.
  8. Dickens’ House, Portsmouth: I’ve been to Dickens’ house in London, and the museum in what was once his childhood home seems like a great complement to that visit.
  9. Beckford’s Tower, Bath: This strange garden folly was the hideout of William Beckford, the nineteenth-century novelist who in his day was famous for writing the Gothic novel Vathek. He’s less well-known today, but this tower is apparently quite an odd building.
  10. Edinburgh: Finally, this famous ‘City of Literature’. Edinburgh obviously has a huge number of literary links, and since this is where I’m going to be spending the majority of my time, it seems appropriate that I finish with this beautiful city. From Walter Scott to J.K. Rowling, I’m sure that Edinburgh will provide me with all the literary-themed outings that my little heart could possibly wish for.

Which literary sites are on your ‘To Visit’ list?

Image by Michael Reeve, edited by me.

Advertisements

25 thoughts on “Top Ten Literary Places I’d Like to Visit

  1. You should visit the Jane Austen Centre at Bath! There is also a lovely Jane Austen themed walk that happens in Bath every now and then. They take to places that inspired Jane Austen’s novels while stayed there and also show you the homes that she stayed in.

    Don’t forget to visit Strafford-upon-Avon – Another lovely place! Similar to the Jane Austen Walk, there is a Shakespeare-themed walk, where they show all things Shakespeare and even take you to his grave. Also, there are these lovely museums dedicated to him and most of the houses that he had stayed in have been turned into a museum of sorts. One of them is the Shakespeare’s Centre, which I think is based out of his childhood home.

    Studied in the UK also for a year – visited all the places I could and these were some them while I was there. UK is a really lovely place to go around and be touristy. Where would be based out of for your year long study sojourn? :)

    • Thanks so much for your suggestions! I’m based in Edinburgh, so there’s lots of literary events in the city every week. I went to Bath and Stratford-Upon-Avon a few years ago, but they’re definitely places I want to revisit. :)

  2. This is a great post. Two obvious places are Howarth, West Yorkshire because of the Brontë sisters – Charlotte, Emily and Anne; Baker Street because of Sherlock Holmes. In terms of the Grail legends, much comes from the old folk tales of Wales, especially Snowdonia – Google “Merlin” and “Dinas Emrys” for examples, and also the various sites on Anglesey.

  3. Lovely idea! I hope you enjoy your time in the UK and maybe get the chance to visit some of the places on your list! I often think about the places I’d like to visit outside of the UK, but I really should travel around the UK more.

  4. I don’t live far from Abbotsford and I’m afraid I’ve still not been. Seen it from the road many many times, it looks so beautiful. Must go sometime and take some pictures.

    I really want to go to Haworth. I’ve been before but I was only 9 and didn’t appreciate the Brontes at all. Would love to go again! And the Lakes too – again I’ve been, but I was even younger, 6 or 7 maybe, and I don’t remember it :(

    Oh and Bath – never been there and would love to!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s